Accept Cookies?
Provided by OpenGlobal E-commerce

Please wait while your page loads ...

FARAFARA Cure FA

 

Scientific News

FARA funds research progress

In this section, you will find the most recent FA research publications, many of which are funded by FARA, as well as information on upcoming conferences and symposiums. You can search for articles by date using the archive box in the right hand column. To locate FARA Funded or Supported Research, click the hyperlink in the right hand column. You may also search for specific content using key words or phrases in the search button at the top right of your screen. Please be sure to visit other key research sections of our website for information on FARA’s Grant Program and the Treatment Pipeline.

 


 

Altered neocortical tactile but preserved auditory early change detection responses in Friedreich ataxia

This group used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of responses involved in sensory processing in the neocortex, and the identify any early changes that might occur in FA. They looked at tactile (TERs) and auditory (AERs) evoked responses and early neocortical change detection responses indexed by the mismatch negativity (MMN) in sixteen FRDA patients and matched healthy subjects. They looked for correlations between the maximal amplitude of each response, genotype and clinical parameters. They found that evoked responses were detectable in all FRDA patients but one. In patients, TERs were delayed and reduced in amplitude, while AERs were only delayed. Only tactile MMN responses at the contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex were altered in FRDA patients. Maximal amplitudes of TERs, AERs and tactile MMN correlated with genotype, but did not correlate with clinical parameters. The authors conclude that in FRDA, the amplitude of tactile MMN responses are reduced and correlate with the genotype, while auditory MMN responses are not altered.

Read the entire article HERE

Young Investigators: Call for Abstracts, 12th Annual FA Symposium

Young investigators are invited to present posters at the 12th Annual Friedreich’s Ataxia Symposium hosted by The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and FARA at a welcome reception on the evening of Sunday, October 13, and throughout the day on Monday, October 14, 2018 at the Crowne Plaza Valley Forge in King of Prussia, PA. This symposium presents an opportunity to share your work not only with colleagues but also with the patient community. Priority will be given to those who can best present to a lay audience. Deadline for submissions: July 15th, 2019.

Call for abstracts
Abstract submission form

Microvascular pathology in Friedreich cardiomyopathy

Heart disease is an integral part of Friedreich ataxia (FA). In addition to cardiomyocytes getting bigger, death of muscle fibers, and inflammatory infiltration, heart tissues show fibrosis and disorganized capillaries. This group examined the left ventricular wall (LVW) of 41 homozygous and 2 compound heterozygous FA patients aged 10-87 and 21 controls aged 2-69. They quantified the numbers of capillaries for comparison with the number of cardiac cells in the same field. The median ratio of capillaries to cardiomyocytes in samples from unaffected individuals was 1.0. In FA, the number of cardiomyocytes/mm² was significantly less, and the median ratio of capillaries to heart fibers was 2.0. There was a significant correlation of the expanded guanine-adenine-adenine trinucleotides (shorter allele, GAA1) with a younger age of onset, shorter disease duration, and lower cardiomyocyte counts. The ratio of capillaries to heart fibers was higher in patients with long GAA1 repeat expansions. Data supports endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis in FA. We propose that the pathogenesis of FA heart disease includes primary fibrosis.

Read the entire article HERE



Download the Q&A PDF HERE

p53 Binds Preferentially to Non-B DNA Structures Formed by the Pyrimidine-Rich Strands of GAA·TTC Trinucleotide Repeats Associated with Friedreich's Ataxia

Expansions of trinucleotide repeats are associated with genetic disorders such as Friedreich's ataxia. The tumor suppressor p53 is a central regulator of cell fate in response to different types of insults. p53 protein recognizes specific structures in the DNA, dependent on sequence and structure. The focus of this work was analysis of the p53 structure-selective recognition of repeat sequences associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. The group studied how p53 and several deletion variants bound to repeat sequences folded into different shapes that occur in cells. They show that p53 binds to all studied DNA structures that are not the standard helical structure (non-B DNA structure), with a preference for structures formed by pyrimidine rich strands. They found a specific part of p53 to be crucial for recognition of such non-B DNA structures. They also observed that p53 prefers binding to the Pyrimidine-rich strand over the purine rich strand in non-B DNA from the repeat sequence in the first intron of the frataxin gene. The binding of p53 to this region was confirmed in human Friedreich's ataxia fibroblast and adenocarcinoma cells. Altogether these observations provide further evidence that p53 binds to non-B DNA structures in trinucleotide repeat sequences.

Read the entire article HERE

Dimethyl fumarate dosing in humans increases frataxin expression: A potential therapy for Friedreich's Ataxia

High throughput screening of clinically used drugs identified Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) as protective in FA patient cells. This group demonstrates that DMF significantly increases frataxin gene (FXN) expression in FA cell models, FA mouse models and in DMF treated humans. DMF also rescues mitochondrial biogenesis deficiency in FA-patient derived cell models. In FA patient cells, they demonstrate that DMF significantly increases initiation of new FXN transcripts and reduction in DNA structures thought to slow FXN production, significantly increasing FXN expression. Lastly, DMF dosed Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients showed significant increase in FXN expression by ~85%. As deficiency in FXN is the primary cause of FA, and DMF is demonstrated to increase FXN expression in humans, with further work DMF could be a possible therapy for FA.

Read the entire article HERE



Download the Q&A PDF HERE

Page 1 of 164

SHARE

FacebookTwitterLinkedInYoutube
Event C.jpg

 

Archived in
  Scientific News


 

 

Tagged in
FARA Scientific News