Accept Cookies?
Provided by OpenGlobal E-commerce

Please wait while your page loads ...

 

Scientific News

FARA funds research progress

In this section, you will find the most recent FA research publications, many of which are funded by FARA, as well as information on upcoming conferences and symposiums. You can search for articles by date using the archive box in the right hand column. To locate FARA Funded or Supported Research, click the hyperlink in the right hand column. You may also search for specific content using key words or phrases in the search button at the top right of your screen. Please be sure to visit other key research sections of our website for information on FARA’s Grant Program and the Treatment Pipeline.


Cardiac Transplantation in Friedreich Ataxia

In this paper, we describe a 14-year-old boy with a confirmed diagnosis of Friedreich ataxia who underwent cardiac transplantation for left ventricular failure secondary to dilated cardiomyopathy with restrictive physiology. His neurological status prior to transplantation reflected early signs of neurologic disease, with evidence of dysarthria, weakness, mild gait impairment, and limb ataxia. We review the ethical issues considered during the process leading to the decision to offer cardiac transplantation.

Read More: Cardiac Transplantation in Friedreich Ataxia

Clinical Features of Friedreich Ataxia

Friedreich ataxia, the most common hereditary ataxia, affects approximately 1 per 29,000 white individuals. In about 98% of these individuals, it is due to homozygosity for a GAA trinucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of FXN; in the other 2%, it is due to compound heterozygosity for a GAA expansion and point mutation or deletion.

Read More: Clinical Features of Friedreich Ataxia

Novel Diagnostic Paradigms for Friedreich Ataxia

Friedreich ataxia is the most common inherited ataxia, with a wide phenotypic spectrum. It is generally caused by GAA expansions on both alleles of FXN, but a small percentage of patients are compound heterozygotes for a pathogenic expansion and a point mutation. Two recent diagnostic innovations are further characterizing individuals with the phenotype but without the classic genotypes.

Read More: Novel Diagnostic Paradigms for Friedreich Ataxia

Clinical data and characterization of the liver conditional mouse model exclude neoplasia as a non-neurological manifestation associated with Friedreich's ataxia

Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) is the most common hereditary ataxia in the caucasian population and is characterized by a mixed spinocerebellar and sensory ataxia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and increased incidence of diabetes. FRDA is caused by impaired expression of the FXN gene coding for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. During the past ten years, the development of mouse models of FRDA has allowed better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Among the mouse models of FRDA, the liver conditional mouse model pointed to a tumor suppressor activity of frataxin leading to the hypothesis that individuals with FRDA might be predisposed to cancer.

Read More: Clinical data and characterization of the liver conditional mouse model exclude neoplasia as a non-neurological manifestation associated with Friedreich's ataxia

Apn1 AP-endonuclease is essential for the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA bases in yeast frataxin-deficient cells

Frataxin deficiency results in mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress and it is the cause of the hereditary neurodegenerative disease Friedreich ataxia (FA). Here, we present evidence that one of the pleiotropic effects of oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient yeast cells (Δyfh1 mutant) is damage to nuclear DNA and that repair requires the Apn1 AP-endonuclease of the base excision repair pathway.

Read More: Apn1 AP-endonuclease is essential for the repair of oxidatively damaged DNA bases in yeast frataxin-deficient cells

Page 154 of 211

SHARE

FacebookTwitterLinkedInYoutube
farm-to-table.jpg

 

Archived in
  Scientific News


 

 

Tagged in
FARA Scientific News


Site Map     Privacy Policy      Service Terms      Contact      Charity Navigator