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Scientific News

FARA funds research progress

In this section, you will find the most recent FA research publications, many of which are funded by FARA, as well as information on upcoming conferences and symposiums. You can search for articles by date using the archive box in the right hand column. To locate FARA Funded or Supported Research, click the hyperlink in the right hand column. You may also search for specific content using key words or phrases in the search button at the top right of your screen. Please be sure to visit other key research sections of our website for information on FARA’s Grant Program and the Treatment Pipeline.


Prolonged treatment with pimelic o-aminobenzamide HDAC inhibitors ameliorates the disease phenotype of a Friedreich ataxia mouse model

Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by GAA repeat expansion within the FXN gene, leading to epigenetic changes and heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing that result in a frataxin protein deficit. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, including pimelic o-aminobenzamide compounds 106, 109 and 136, have previously been shown to reverse FXN gene silencing in short-term studies of FRDA patient cells and a knock-in mouse model, but the functional consequences of such therapeutic intervention have thus far not been described.

Prolonged treatment with pimelic o-aminobenzamide HDAC inhibitors ameliorates the disease phenotype of a Friedreich ataxia mouse model

Impaired myocardial perfusion reserve & fibrosis in Friedreich ataxia: a mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with metabolic syndrome

Cardiomyopathy produces significant mortality in patients with Friedreich ataxia (FA), a genetic disorder that produces intra-mitochondrial iron accumulation. We sought to test the hypothesis that abnormal myocardial perfusion reserve and fibrosis represent early manifestations of cardiomyopathy.

Impaired myocardial perfusion reserve and fibrosis in Friedreich ataxia: a mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with metabolic syndrome

Impaired inhibition of prepotent motor tendencies in Friedreich ataxia demonstrated by the Simon interference task

Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most common of the genetically inherited ataxias. We recently demonstrated that people with FRDA have impairment in motor planning – most likely because of pathology affecting the cerebral cortex and/or cerebello-cortical projections. We used the Simon interference task to examine how effective 13 individuals with FRDA were at inhibiting inappropriate automatic responses associated with stimulus–response incompatibility in comparison with control participants.

Impaired inhibition of prepotent motor tendencies in Friedreich ataxia demonstrated by the Simon interference task

Mammalian Frataxin: An Essential Function for Cellular Viability through an Interaction with a Preformed ISCU/NFS1/ISD11 Iron-Sulfur Assembly Complex

Frataxin, the mitochondrial protein deficient in Friedreich ataxia, a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, is thought to be involved in multiple iron-dependent mitochondrial pathways. In particular, frataxin plays an important role in the formation of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters biogenesis.

Mammalian Frataxin: An Essential Function for Cellular Viability through an Interaction with a Preformed ISCU/NFS1/ISD11 Iron-Sulfur Assembly Complex

The Mitochondrial Connection in Auditory Neuropathy

'Auditory neuropathy' (AN), the term used to codify a primary degeneration of the auditory nerve, can be linked directly or indirectly to mitochondrial dysfunction. These observations are based on the expression of AN in known mitochondrial-based neurological diseases (Friedreich's ataxia, Mohr-Tranebjærg syndrome), in conditions where defects in axonal transport, protein trafficking, and fusion processes perturb and/or disrupt mitochondrial dynamics (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, autosomal dominant optic atrophy), in a common neonatal condition known to be toxic to mitochondria (hyperbilirubinemia), and where respiratory chain deficiencies produce reductions in oxidative phosphorylation that adversely affect peripheral auditory mechanisms. 

The Mitochondrial Connection in Auditory Neuropathy

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